Port closures in Ukraine could lead to global famine: UN

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David Beasley, head of the UN World Food Program, warned that the closure of Ukrainian ports on the Black Sea could cause global famine. According to Beasley, the grain fields in the Ukraine are capable of feed 400 million people.

“We have to open those ports, have them operational; if not, we will have catastrophe upon catastrophe. Millions of people will starvedeclared the UN official.

Due to the war and Russian military control over the ports of Odessa, food production has decreased and grain cannot be transported in and out of Ukraine.

Millions of metric tons remain stored in silos in Odessa and nearby ports, according to the UN; other reserves are stranded on ships immobile in ports.

Unless the ports open, Ukrainian farmers they will not be able to store the next crop July and August, so “mountains of grain will go to waste” while the World Food Program and the world will have to combat a “global food crisis catastrophe“said the UN.

David Beasley stated that 5 years ago he hoped to solve the danger of starvation of 80 million people and that the World Food Program would no longer be needed. “We would have ended famine and created sustainable resilience. But we’ve had one man-made conflict after another“, lament.

According to the official, the climate crisis caused the figure of 80 million people at risk of living in famine to increase to 135 million; added that with the arrival of Covid-19, that number will increased to 276 million human beings they were “heading” for starvation. Beasley further noted that approximately 48 million people are about to live in famine.

During the conference, the official was asked what he would say to Putin to convince him. “If you have any heart for the rest of the world, regardless of how you feel about Ukraine, you must open those ports.“, answered.

East Africa, the Middle East, Central America and other regions of the world are the most “vulnerable” to war-induced food shortages. David Beasley insisted on the opening of ports and the recovery of resources to avoid famine, economic destabilization and mass migration globally.

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