Nearly 400 deaths reported due to floods in South Africa | News

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Nearly 400 deaths were reported this Friday by local South African authorities due to the floods that hit the Durban region, the port city of KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), the third largest in South Africa.

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According to local media, the death toll reached 395 hours ago, although it is feared that more bodies will continue to appear. At the same time, the number of affected people increases to 41,000 in a city where the storms devastated streets, bridges, basic service infrastructure and houses.

After the passage of the storms, the local authorities turned to rescue those affected and quantify the human and material losses.

Five days after the gale, they explain that there is no longer much hope of finding survivors, although the work of rescuing bodies continues.

The head of the KZN Government, Sihle Zikalala, previously estimated that the material losses will cause a millionaire expense to the country and advocated the declaration of a state of catastrophe in the city, to allow the release of government funds aimed at the recovery of the territory.

“Every year we make a budget for emergencies like this, and that amount is available, it can be used from Monday,” South African Finance Minister Enoch Godongwana told local media.

The National Department of Transportation expressed its intention to support the province “for a period of three years to deal with the current disaster it is facing with additional financial resources.”

Weather forecasts declare the arrival of more storms and floods also in the provinces of the Free State (center) and Eastern Cape (southeast), during the weekend.

For this reason, the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (Cogta) asked the population to take refuge on higher ground or to go to shelters to avoid further human losses.

It is estimated that the emergency funds released must exceed 60 million dollars, to effectively repair the damaged infrastructure and care for the victims.

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