LEDC will give bilingual help to minority entrepreneurs

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A new project in the City of Alexandria, Virginia, which bears the name of The Damascus Project, was announced on Monday the 14th by the Episcopal Church of San Pablo and the Latino Economic Development Center (LEDC), in an act that was attended by from Mayor Justin Wilson.

The Damascus Project is a commitment from St. Paul’s Episcopal Church with a three-year, $150,000 fund to enable the center to support minority entrepreneurs operating within city limits who require bilingual technical assistance. for small businesses and access to capital.

In this regard, LEDC has committed to helping some 75 clients over three years through its many small business programs.

Among these is LEDC’s Small Business Program, Empowered Women’s International (EWI), which will deliver a three-month, sixty-hour online course called Entrepreneur Training for Success. Applications are currently open for the first course which will start in the spring of 2022, a spokeswoman said.

“This course will equip female entrepreneurs with the fundamentals of business ownership, with a particular focus on financial literacy and leadership, enabling these women to impart their newfound wisdom to other women,” she explained.

In addition, the LEDC Loan Program will provide access to low-cost microloans for starting and growing new and existing minority-owned small businesses, as well as 0% interest consumer loans for individuals seeking credit. .

Emi Reyes, Executive Director of LEDC, highlighted this opportunity to increase LEDC’s efforts in Alexandria, VA. “I thank the Reverend Oran Warder, Rector of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, and the entire church for entrusting his community to us,” she said. She also said she looks forward to the next three years of partnership “as we work together to support the growth of local business corridors, catalyze job creation and build assets among low- and moderate-income Alexandria residents.”

The Latino Economic Development Center (LEDC) is tasked with equipping small business owners from Hispanics and other underserved communities in the Washington, DC metro area with the financial skills and tools to create a better future for their families and communities.

This work extends to the Baltimore metropolitan area and Puerto Rico.

Participants in LEDC programs also learn how to buy and stay in their homes, join with their neighbors to keep their rental homes affordable, and start or expand small businesses.

A new project in the City of Alexandria, Virginia, which bears the name of The Damascus Project, was announced on Monday the 14th by the Episcopal Church of San Pablo and the Latino Economic Development Center (LEDC), in an act that was attended by from Mayor Justin Wilson.

The Damascus Project is a commitment from St. Paul’s Episcopal Church with a three-year, $150,000 fund to enable the center to support minority entrepreneurs operating within city limits who require bilingual technical assistance. for small businesses and access to capital.

In this regard, LEDC has committed to helping some 75 clients over three years through its many small business programs.

Among these is LEDC’s Small Business Program, Empowered Women’s International (EWI), which will deliver a three-month, sixty-hour online course called Entrepreneur Training for Success. Applications are currently open for the first course which will start in the spring of 2022, a spokeswoman said.

“This course will equip female entrepreneurs with the fundamentals of business ownership, with a particular focus on financial literacy and leadership, enabling these women to impart their newfound wisdom to other women,” she explained.

In addition, the LEDC Loan Program will provide access to low-cost microloans for starting and growing new and existing minority-owned small businesses, as well as 0% interest consumer loans for individuals seeking credit. .

Emi Reyes, Executive Director of LEDC, highlighted this opportunity to increase LEDC’s efforts in Alexandria, VA. “I thank the Reverend Oran Warder, Rector of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, and the entire church for entrusting his community to us,” she said. She also said she looks forward to the next three years of partnership “as we work together to support the growth of local business corridors, catalyze job creation and build assets among low- and moderate-income Alexandria residents.”

The Latino Economic Development Center (LEDC) is tasked with equipping small business owners from Hispanics and other underserved communities in the Washington, DC metro area with the financial skills and tools to create a better future for their families and communities.

This work extends to the Baltimore metropolitan area and Puerto Rico.

Participants in LEDC programs also learn how to buy and stay in their homes, join with their neighbors to keep their rental homes affordable, and start or expand small businesses.

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